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President criticises Čentéš

SLOVAKIA's president Ivan Gašparovič has criticised general prosecutor-elect Jozef Čentéš for shredding the testimony of independent MP Igor Matovič and deleting a copy from his computer, the Hospodárske Noviny daily reported on August 12.

SLOVAKIA's president Ivan Gašparovič has criticised general prosecutor-elect Jozef Čentéš for shredding the testimony of independent MP Igor Matovič and deleting a copy from his computer, the Hospodárske Noviny daily reported on August 12.

“There must be a very serious reason for shredding such a document at the prosecutor’s office,” Gašparovič said, as quoted by the daily. “Like it or not, it leaves a big question mark.”

The president noted that the case might also affect his decision about whether or not to appoint Čentéš to the post of general prosecutor.

President Gašparovič is insisting on waiting for a ruling by the Constitutional Court on a change made by MPs to the method used to select the general prosecutor before making his decision.

However, Čentéš was selected by MPs using the old method, to which Gašparovič has never objected.

Slovak presidents’ appointment of MPs’ choices for the job have always previously been a formality.

Matovič met Čentéš on July 29 to report accusations of corruption in the state administration.

After he received the MP’s testimony, Čentéš says he unintentionally deleted the file from his computer and also shredded the hard copy.


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