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Siren tests at nuclear power plant suspended after false alarm

Tests of the emergency siren system at Jaslovské Bohunice nuclear power plant (Trnava Region) have been suspended after they led to a false alarm last week which left thousands of local residents fearing that the plant had suffered a serious incident.

Tests of the emergency siren system at Jaslovské Bohunice nuclear power plant (Trnava Region) have been suspended after they led to a false alarm last week which left thousands of local residents fearing that the plant had suffered a serious incident.

The Telegrafia company, which was testing new sirens in the vicinity of the plant, suspended all work on them after the false alarm on Wednesday, August 17. The high-pitched signal was heard by thousands of inhabitants within a 21-kilometre radius around the plant. Many called or attempted to call local-authority or emergency telephone lines, but those manning the lines were unable to tell them why the siren had been sounded.

Specifically, Telegrafia was testing the connection between the sirens and sensors measuring radioactivity around the plant. Telegrafia's Matej Furda said that the sirens were activated "due to a bad setting" but should not have been, the Sme daily reported. After sounding for one minute, the sirens were stopped.

Plant operator Slovenske Elektrárne says it intends to seek damages from Telegrafia, and also wants to prevent false alarms in future. The company says it has already taken the necessary measures, Sme wrote on Tuesday, August 23.

Source: Sme

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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