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Slovaks build solar plants to sterilise drinking water in Kenya

Kenyans will have better access to safe drinking water because Slovaks working in this African country have started to use electricity and UV rays to sterilise water, the SITA newswire reported.

Kenyans will have better access to safe drinking water because Slovaks working in this African country have started to use electricity and UV rays to sterilise water, the SITA newswire reported.

Because of the lack of electricity in sub-Saharan Africa, the Slovaks in Kenya plan to build five off-grid solar power plants to help deal with this problem.

“Kenya is dependent on water and geothermal energy and the import of electricity from nearby Uganda,” said Roman Krajčovič, from the Aurex company, as quoted by SITA. He added that the total consumption of electricity in the country is about 1,200 MW, which is divided between 40 million people.

Slovaks living in Kenya decided to erect their own solar photovoltaic systems to produce electricity and Krajčovič explained that this system is ideal because electricity can be generated and delivered to remote rural areas.

The project called Drink from the Sun has been supported by Slovak government, which allocated €207,000 to the project.

Source: SITA

Compiled by Radka Minarechová from press reports
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