Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

AROUND SLOVAKIA

Visually impaired ‘actors’ shoot movie for sighted population

It can be hard for those who see perfectly to understand the life of the visually impaired, To address this, the Slovak Blind and Partially Sighted Union recently presented a short instruction movie in Trenčín. Its authenticity is ensured by the fact that the actors are both visually impaired people and the movie was shot in the hustle and bustle of everyday life.

It can be hard for those who see perfectly to understand the life of the visually impaired, To address this, the Slovak Blind and Partially Sighted Union recently presented a short instruction movie in Trenčín. Its authenticity is ensured by the fact that the actors are both visually impaired people and the movie was shot in the hustle and bustle of everyday life.

“The film points out that if those with perfect sight manage details and correct habits in their contacts with blind people their mutual interaction is more pleasant and agreeable for both sides. I appreciate very much the willingness of visually impaired actors to participate in the project and express with their own words how society perceives and handles those who are visually impaired,” project coordinator Silvia Ondrejičková told the TASR newswire.

She added that the movie shows six situations in the everyday life of visually impaired people: a ride on city transport; travel to a specific destination; having a meal in a restaurant; arranging administrative issues with a guide; meeting acquaintances in the street; and visiting a cultural event with a guide. The movie is more than 22 minutes long and will be distributed to all the regional centres of the union, to universities focused on social work, and will also be made available on the union’s website, unss.sk. The union has more than 4,700 members associated in 68 branches and its aim is to help and advise visually impaired people in each of Slovakia’s regions.

Top stories

In praise of concrete

It was once notorious for its drab tower blocks and urban crime, but Petržalka now epitomises modern Slovakia.

Petržalka is the epitome of communist-era architecture.

Slow down, fashion

Most people are unaware that buying too many clothes too harms the environment.

In shallow waters, experts are expendable

Mihál says that it is Sulík, the man whom his political opponents mocked for having a calculator for a brain, who “is pulling the party out of liberal waters and towards somewhere completely different”.

Richard Sulík is a man of slang.

Blog: Exploring 20th century military sites in Bratislava

It seems to be the fate of military sites and objects in Bratislava that none of them were ever used for the purposes they were built for - cavernas from WWI, bunkers from WWII, nuclear shelters or the anti-aircraft…

One nuclear shelter with a capacity for several hundred people now serves as a music club with suitable name Subclub (formerly U-club).