Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

NEWS IN SHORT

Judges may be allowed to comment

UNLIKE the Czech Republic, Slovakia’s judges are not allowed to comment publicly on the verdicts they pass in court cases. But now Justice Minister Lucia Žitňanská wants to change this by amending the law, the Sme daily reported.

UNLIKE the Czech Republic, Slovakia’s judges are not allowed to comment publicly on the verdicts they pass in court cases. But now Justice Minister Lucia Žitňanská wants to change this by amending the law, the Sme daily reported.

“I am convinced that people will trust the courts more if they understand their rulings,” stated Žitňanská, as quoted by the daily.

Sme listed the verdicts in the cases of the release of the former head of the Slovak Intelligence Service (SIS) Ivan Lexa, the instances of high compensation payments awarded to politicians for libel, and the verdict in the case of medical student Ľudmila Cervanová as having led to public bewilderment.

The latter was discussed recently on Štefan Hríb’s talk show Pod lampou (Under the Lamp), broadcast by Slovak Television (STV). The General Prosecutor’s Office criticised the show because Hríb invited the men who were found guilty of murdering Cervanová to appear.

Judge Katarína Javorčíková from the initiative For Open Justice supported Žitňanská’s proposal and said that it is the constitutional right of judges to express freely their opinion on cases.

However, she said that judges should be able to comment only on closed cases, not on those which are still ongoing.


Top stories

In praise of concrete

It was once notorious for its drab tower blocks and urban crime, but Petržalka now epitomises modern Slovakia.

Petržalka is the epitome of communist-era architecture.

Slow down, fashion

Most people are unaware that buying too many clothes too harms the environment.

In shallow waters, experts are expendable

Mihál says that it is Sulík, the man whom his political opponents mocked for having a calculator for a brain, who “is pulling the party out of liberal waters and towards somewhere completely different”.

Richard Sulík is a man of slang.

Blog: Exploring 20th century military sites in Bratislava

It seems to be the fate of military sites and objects in Bratislava that none of them were ever used for the purposes they were built for - cavernas from WWI, bunkers from WWII, nuclear shelters or the anti-aircraft…

One nuclear shelter with a capacity for several hundred people now serves as a music club with suitable name Subclub (formerly U-club).