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Sections of D1 highway bid at lower price than under cancelled PPP

Three sections of the D1 Highway, originally planned as a public-private partnership (PPP) project, that were to have cost €747 million, have a new price offer of €312 million.

Three sections of the D1 Highway, originally planned as a public-private partnership (PPP) project, that were to have cost €747 million, have a new price offer of €312 million.

The three sections that were a subject of new tenders will be most likely built by Váhostav and Doprastav, the companies that participated in the original project. The bidder with the cheapest bid, the Hant BA and Cestné stavby Liptovský Mikuláš consortium, that bid €99 million was excluded from the competition for lack of expertise, the Sme daily wrote on September 2. The Transport Ministry says its new approach to highway construction enables wider competition that forces prices downwards.

Representatives of the competing companies stated that changes in the market and the possibility to choose from several construction technologies help curb the price offers. Expert Ľubomír Palčák praised the reduction in price but warned that the quality must be closely watched.

Source: Sme

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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