Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

Malacky Roma family moves from their house, which will now be demolished

The Roma family living on Družstevná Street in Malacky, the subject of media reports over the past several months, have moved from their house, which should be destroyed within two months, the Nový čas daily reported.

The Roma family living on Družstevná Street in Malacky, the subject of media reports over the past several months, have moved from their house, which should be destroyed within two months, the Nový čas daily reported.

Though the house should have been demolished on September 5 according to a ruling by the Regional Construction Office made in July, it is still standing, Nový čas wrote in its September 6 issue, adding that municipal representatives plan to turn to the local prosecutor and ask him to set a date for demolition.

The daily wrote that the family has had a record of disputes with neighbour Oskar Dobrovodský and other neighbours and that before June the local authorities had failed to resolve the situation.

Malacky Mayor Jozef Ondrejka said that the issue should be finally resolved next week and the main question is whether to offer compensatory housing to what he called “the less adaptable family” or not.

Source: Nový čas

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

Top stories

Legitimising fake news

One of Slovakia’s media schools has invited a well-known conspiracy theorist to an academic conference. What does this say about the state of the Slovak media?

Tibor Rostas

Suicide game does not exist and visa-free regime for Ukrainians is not a lie

The Slovak Spectator brings you a selection of hoaxes from the past two weeks.

There is no computer game that makes people commit suicides.

It’s not easy being an ‘alien’ in Slovakia

Are Slovaks scared of foreigners? The stories of those who are trying to make their homes here suggest that ignorance and bureaucratic inertia, rather than fear, cause more problems.

Dealing with state offices may be difficult and time-demanding.

President Kiska uses train for first time Photo

After criticism from coalition MPs for flying and a troublesome car trip, Slovak President Kiska to commute to Bratislava by international train, boarding it in his hometown of Poprad.

President Kiska gets off the IC train in Bratislava.