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Judicial Council refuses to back Harabin

The Judicial Council, which is chaired by Supreme Court president Štefan Harabin, voted not to support a proposed motion to the Constitutional Court which would have launched a disciplinary proceeding against a Constitutional Court senate composed of three judges, namely Ján Luby, Ladislav Orosz and Ľudmila Gajdošíková.

The Judicial Council, which is chaired by Supreme Court president Štefan Harabin, voted not to support a proposed motion to the Constitutional Court which would have launched a disciplinary proceeding against a Constitutional Court senate composed of three judges, namely Ján Luby, Ladislav Orosz and Ľudmila Gajdošíková.

Harabin was among the strongest supporters of the motion, which suggested the judges should be punished for dismissing a complaint from Daniel Hudák, a former member of the Judicial Council. Hudák was removed from his post by the government in February. Harabin argued the senate was biased and alleges that Alexander Bröstl, who replaced Hudák on the Judicial Council, was an adviser of the three judges, the Hospodárske Noviny daily wrote.

The Sme daily wrote on Thursday, September 8, that Harabin had made several mistakes, referring on several occasions to the whole plenum of the Constitutional Court instead of the particular senate in question, and also criticising the Constitutional Court for passing disciplinary sanctions against him for preventing auditors from the Finance Ministry from reviewing the financial management of the Supreme Court.

Sources: Hospodárske Noviny, Sme

To read more on this story, please see: Judicial Council seeks to discipline constitutional judges .

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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