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'Suspicious’ nominees list posted

A LIST of what Igor Matovič, an independent MP and leader of the Ordinary People group, called the names of political nominees who are filling posts in the public sector has been released.

A LIST of what Igor Matovič, an independent MP and leader of the Ordinary People group, called the names of political nominees who are filling posts in the public sector has been released.

“Today I came across this list of names, institutions and positions – plus there are some political parties noted. Who knows what it all could mean? If you know someone and you find something wrong or missing, then let me know; thanks,” wrote Matovič when he posted the list on his personal Facebook page.

Labelled 'Part 1', the list has the names of more than 1,000 individuals in alphabetical order, along with the institutions where they work and their specific posts.

MPs from the parties of the governing coalition quickly criticised the release of the names, arguing that it could harm persons whose nominations were transparent and those who are experts in their fields.

“Eleven people on the list, who are labelled as SaS nominees, have been there [in their jobs] for 10 or 20 years,” said Richard Sulík, the chairman of Freedom and Solidarity (SaS) party, as quoted by the TASR newswire.

The chairman of Most-Híd party, Béla Bugár, said that even though particular persons were nominated by a political party, this does not automatically mean that they are partisan candidates. He added that the practice of political parties installing their nominees in government posts is normal and not a corrupt practice.

Jozef Mikuš, an MP from the Slovak Democratic and Christian Union (SDKÚ), stated that the political parties bear responsibility for their nominees and rejected Matovič’s statements about lack of expertise by certain nominees of the political parties.


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