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Nuclear plants pass stress tests

NUCLEAR power plants in Slovakia have so far passed the stress tests that were ordered after the disaster at the Fukushima reactor in Japan. Slovakia’s Nuclear Regulatory Authority (ÚJD) delivered its interim national report on stress tests of the country’s nuclear power plants to the European Commission on September 14.

NUCLEAR power plants in Slovakia have so far passed the stress tests that were ordered after the disaster at the Fukushima reactor in Japan. Slovakia’s Nuclear Regulatory Authority (ÚJD) delivered its interim national report on stress tests of the country’s nuclear power plants to the European Commission on September 14.

“The stress tests have not identified any deficiencies requiring immediate remedial measures or a shutdown of operating nuclear power plants,” the ÚJD wrote in its press statement. “The response of the tested power plants to the stress tests corresponds with the required safety level.”

Slovakia, along with other EU countries, is carrying out the stress tests because of the scope of the disaster at the Fukushima nuclear facility. Operators of nuclear power plants in Europe are required to undertake comprehensive risk and safety assessments under the supervision of their national regulatory authorities. In Slovakia, this is being done by Slovenské Elektrárne, the operator of nuclear power plants in Jaslovské Bohunice and Mochovce.

The stress tests started on June 1 and ÚJD’s interim report describes the approach used and current status of the facilities in meeting the stress tests. The deadline for ÚJD to complete its final report on Slovakia’s nuclear power plants is October 31 and Slovakia is scheduled to transmit its closing national report to the European Commission by December 31.


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