Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

More foreign tourists arrive in Slovakia

The number of foreign tourists coming to Slovakia is increasing. During the first half of 2011 it grew by 12 percent year-on-year to 658,000, the Slovak Tourist Board (SACR) said at a press conference on September 20.

The number of foreign tourists coming to Slovakia is increasing. During the first half of 2011 it grew by 12 percent year-on-year to 658,000, the Slovak Tourist Board (SACR) said at a press conference on September 20.

“The statistics show that one out of every three visitors comes from the Czech Republic,” said Transport Minister Ján Figeľ, as quoted by the TASR newswire, adding that during the first six months of 2011 the number of Czech tourists grew by 11.1 percent year-on-year.

The number of tourists from Hungary increased by 21.5 percent during the same period. The head of SACR, Peter Belinský, said he believes that such growth could have been caused by the improvement seen in bilateral relations between Hungary and Slovakia, TASR wrote.

The number of Polish tourists, who are especially fond of the High Tatras, grew by 5 percent year-on-year.

Source: TASR

Compiled by Radka Minarechová from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

Top stories

EC: Focus on education and labour market

Some recommendations remain the same as last year.

Illustrative stock photo

No Slovaks among the victims of Manchester attack so far

The representatives of Slovakia have expressed their sympathy to the families of the victims.

Police guard close to the Manchester Arena in Manchester, Britain, on May 23, 2017, a day after an explosion.

Slovak paralympic athletes win gold and bronze at World Championship

Three Slovaks became world champions in table tennis in the TM2 category at the World Paralympic Championship in Bratislava.

L-R: Ján Riapoš, Martin Ludrovský in the Slovakia-Taiwan match at the paralympic world championship, May 19.

It's not your Slovakia, Bystrica protesters told Kotleba

President Andrej Kiska spoke to the crowd at the protest gathering, asking Slovaks what kind of country they want to have.