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Former minister Štefanov refuses to testify

Opposition Slovak National party (SNS) party MP and former construction minister Igor Štefanov on Tuesday, September 20, refused to testify before an investigator in the case of the so-called bulletin-board tender. He claimed that the prosecution procedure is effectively criminalising him, the Sme daily reported on Wednesday, September 21.

Opposition Slovak National party (SNS) party MP and former construction minister Igor Štefanov on Tuesday, September 20, refused to testify before an investigator in the case of the so-called bulletin-board tender. He claimed that the prosecution procedure is effectively criminalising him, the Sme daily reported on Wednesday, September 21.

Štefanov has already testified twice in the case. In the spring, police asked parliament to strip him of his parliamentary immunity. The request is currently lodged at the General Prosecutor's Office. His predecessor as minister, Marian Janušek, also from the SNS, has also been accused over the same case. The tender in question, for legal and support services worth €129 million, was won by a consortium of companies close to SNS boss Ján Slota after the tender was announced only via a notice posted on a bulletin board at the ministry in an area not normally accessible to the public. Several audits confirmed that the services provided via the tender were overpriced.

Source: Sme

To read more about the background to this story, see: Štefanov retains his MP immunity.

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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