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Labour Ministry announces four projects to fight long-term unemployment

Four new projects could help address long-term unemployment, including that among Roma citizens, said Lucia Nicholsonová, State Secretary of the Ministry of Labour, Social Affairs and the Family and Miroslav Pollák, the Government Proxy for Roma Communities, at a joint press conference on September 21, the TASR newswire reported. With a total cost of €93.3 million, much of which will be financed from the European Social Fund (ESF), the projects are expected to be launched in 2012. The first project is planned to last for four years and is aimed specifically at residents of Roma settlements. Social workers in the settlements will be assisting people in these communities in situations involving communicating with local authorities or visiting a doctor. The second project concerns community centres and will finance the salaries of social workers, community workers, assistant teachers and health-care workers involved in the first project. The third project involves so-called social enterprises, which in some places have proven useful in tackling long-term unemployment and employment of people with low qualifications. The last project targets marginalised groups of people, who after successfully passing a course will qualify to work as caregivers. Nicholsonová said, as reported by TASR, that designing national projects like this will help prevent the misuse of money destined for marginalized communities of people, adding that out of the 587 approved support projects only 342 were aimed at the social work field for these communities. She stated that only these projects have been used effectively – unlike many others that often had little or nothing to do with the target group of marginalised communities.

Four new projects could help address long-term unemployment, including that among Roma citizens, said Lucia Nicholsonová, State Secretary of the Ministry of Labour, Social Affairs and the Family and Miroslav Pollák, the Government Proxy for Roma Communities, at a joint press conference on September 21, the TASR newswire reported.

With a total cost of €93.3 million, much of which will be financed from the European Social Fund (ESF), the projects are expected to be launched in 2012. The first project is planned to last for four years and is aimed specifically at residents of Roma settlements. Social workers in the settlements will be assisting people in these communities in situations involving communicating with local authorities or visiting a doctor.

The second project concerns community centres and will finance the salaries of social workers, community workers, assistant teachers and health-care workers involved in the first project. The third project involves so-called social enterprises, which in some places have proven useful in tackling long-term unemployment and employment of people with low qualifications. The last project targets marginalised groups of people, who after successfully passing a course will qualify to work as caregivers.

Nicholsonová said, as reported by TASR, that designing national projects like this will help prevent the misuse of money destined for marginalized communities of people, adding that out of the 587 approved support projects only 342 were aimed at the social work field for these communities. She stated that only these projects have been used effectively – unlike many others that often had little or nothing to do with the target group of marginalised communities.

Source: TASR

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
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