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Homeless people present artworks

PEOPLE living at the Bratislava Shelter of St Louise de Marillac had the chance on August 25 to show off their artwork at an exhibition called Metamorphoses-Art of People without a Home. The event attracted many visitors.

A resident at the St Louise de Marillac shelter.(Source: T. Somogyi)

PEOPLE living at the Bratislava Shelter of St Louise de Marillac had the chance on August 25 to show off their artwork at an exhibition called Metamorphoses-Art of People without a Home. The event attracted many visitors.

“Our clients exhibited works about searching,” Katarína Kupcová of the shelter told the TASR newswire. One artwork was called Stopping at a Big City, another painting was titled Walled Dream. These and a huge mosaic installation in the shelter’s garden as well as artworks from leather, rope, wood and sand caught the attention of visitors.

“The mosaic consists of 600 big squares that are put together from yet smaller squares, so it required a lot of work,” Kupcová explained, referring to the installation in the garden.

The shelter offers short-term accommodation for homeless people as well as for those who have been released from hospital and need more time for recuperation. The facility is currently full, with 30 residents.

In addition to their artistic endeavours, residents can use the shelter’s library, play games, and pray. Staff at the shelter help the residents arrange identity documents and find suitable accommodation when they are ready to leave. The shelter is operated by De Paul Slovensko, a non-profit organisation.


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