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SaS remains opposed to changes in bailout mechanisms

The ruling-coalition party Freedom and Solidarity (SaS) is still refusing to support ratification of changes to the European Financial Stability Fund (EFSF) and the establishment of a permanent European Stability Mechanism (ESM). Neither a new proposal from fellow coalition party the Slovak Democratic and Christian Union (SDKÚ) nor a discussion with German President Christian Wulff persuaded the party to change its opinion, the Sme daily reported.

The ruling-coalition party Freedom and Solidarity (SaS) is still refusing to support ratification of changes to the European Financial Stability Fund (EFSF) and the establishment of a permanent European Stability Mechanism (ESM). Neither a new proposal from fellow coalition party the Slovak Democratic and Christian Union (SDKÚ) nor a discussion with German President Christian Wulff persuaded the party to change its opinion, the Sme daily reported.

Representatives of the SDKÚ said they were prepared to discuss compromises. Their latest proposal included a rule allowing discussion and a vote in parliament, and in parliament’s finance committee, on every bailout from the new ESM.

“They will be able to secure more votes than we have, so we reject the suggestion,” SaS members said, as quoted by Sme. Only seven members of 13-member committee belong to coalition parties and SaS, despite chairing it, would not have any right to block a vote.

However, MPs for SaS stressed that they are prepared to continue negotiating to find a solution which, in their words, would not force the public to pay.

SaS leader Richard Sulík discussed the issue of the EFSF and ESM with President Wulff, who asked him to be sympathetic with the rest of the eurozone.

“I have not changed my opinion,” Sulík said, as quoted by Sme. “Our arguments carry great weight for Slovakia.”

Source: Sme

Compiled by Radka Minarechová from press reports
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