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Analysts would support bailout mechanisms

A survey among members of the Club of Economic Analysts (KEA) showed that up to 81 percent of its members would support ratification of changes in the European bailout mechanisms. Meanwhile, only 10 percent of the club’s members linked the possible bankruptcy of Greece to a potential collapse of the whole eurozone, KEA announced in a statement.

A survey among members of the Club of Economic Analysts (KEA) showed that up to 81 percent of its members would support ratification of changes in the European bailout mechanisms. Meanwhile, only 10 percent of the club’s members linked the possible bankruptcy of Greece to a potential collapse of the whole eurozone, KEA announced in a statement.

The results of the inquiry, made between September 27 and October 3, showed that only one of the 21 respondents thought that that saying ‘no’ to the second bailout package for Greece and the establishment of permanent European Stability Mechanism (ESM) would eventually mean the collapse of the euro.

The analysts were disagreed over other issues pertaining to the bailout mechanisms which were included in the survey, for example aid to systemically important banks, and the importance of voting on changes to the European Financial Stability Fund (EFSF).

Source: KEA press report, SITA

Compiled by Radka Minarechová from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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