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Slovak foreign policy complicates extradition from Kosovo, says Serbian minister

The extradition of Karol Mello, wanted for the murder of a woman and a child in 2004, or Baki Sadiki, convicted in Slovakia of drug trafficking, from Kosovo might be legally impossible due to the fact that Slovakia does not recognise Kosovo as an independent state, Serbian Interior Minister Ivica Dačić said in Bratislava on Tuesday, October 4, the TASR newswire reported.

The extradition of Karol Mello, wanted for the murder of a woman and a child in 2004, or Baki Sadiki, convicted in Slovakia of drug trafficking, from Kosovo might be legally impossible due to the fact that Slovakia does not recognise Kosovo as an independent state, Serbian Interior Minister Ivica Dačić said in Bratislava on Tuesday, October 4, the TASR newswire reported.

Dačić pointed out that in line with the UN Security Council Resolution, Serbia has no police forces stationed in Kosovo, with all police co-operation carried out under the international missions UNMIK and EULEX.

“It is through these missions that we asked [on behalf of Slovakia] for the extradition of these men,” Serbian Interior Minister said, as quoted by TASR. He added that though neither Slovakia, nor Serbia recognises Kosovo, it is in the state’s interest to have wanted persons apprehended and extradited for prosecution.

“Kosovo and Metohija [a region in the south-western part of Kosovo] must not become a black hole where criminals can hide to escape justice,” Dačić said, as quoted by TASR.

Source: TASR

Compiled by Radka Minarechová from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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