SLOVAK WORD OF THE WEEK

Ofajč

RICHARD Sulík is a man of slang. To the speaker of parliament any former communist – or for that matter any current member of the socialist Smer party – is a komanč (a Comanche). He despises politicians who have spent their lives zašívaním sa (stitching themselves, which sound painful, but means only that they avoided real work). And any idea he disagrees with is a haluz (literally translated a branch, but actually derived from hallucination).

Richard Sulík is a man of slang.Richard Sulík is a man of slang. (Source: SITA)

RICHARD Sulík is a man of slang. To the speaker of parliament any former communist – or for that matter any current member of the socialist Smer party – is a komanč (a Comanche). He despises politicians who have spent their lives zašívaním sa (stitching themselves, which sound painful, but means only that they avoided real work). And any idea he disagrees with is a haluz (literally translated a branch, but actually derived from hallucination).

So it was little surprise that when a week ago the coalition offered him a compromise on the euro-bailout vote, he dismissed it right away as an ofajč (a swindle, derived from fajčiť, to smoke). Now his SaS party is indicating that that very same proposal, the right of coalition parties to veto any loans from the bail-out fund, sounds acceptable. Opposition leader Robert Fico was quick to call this U-turn Sulík’s ofajč.

It remains to be seen what will come out of the negotiations. But it was high time for SaS to come to its senses and realise that there was no way it could block the mechanism. Their reluctance to vote in favour would only drive them out of government and cause further political instability.

Any regular party would have trouble explaining such a drastic change of heart to its voters. But SaS fans must by now be accustomed to such contradiction. Sulík’s first political priority was to get rid of the fees levied on consumers and used to subsidise the public-service media. But they still exist. There was his failed referendum on a number of issues, most long since forgotten. The legalisation of gay marriage and decriminalisation of marijuana have remained mere election slogans. And the list goes on.

Why does Sulík still have any support, given that he fails to deliver most of what he promises? People must love the way he talks.


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