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Slovakia seeks self-sufficiency in generating electricity

GENERATION as well as consumption of electricity increased in Slovakia in 2010 as the economy revived, with consumption increasing by 5 percent to 28,761 GWh. Electricity generated within the country grew by 6.3 percent in 2010 to 27,720 GWh, meaning that Slovakia had to import 3.6 percent of the electricity it consumed in 2010, a fall from the 4.8 percent imported in 2009, according to the Economy Ministry’s regular electricity supply report. Nuclear power stations generated 53 percent of Slovakia’s electricity, with hydroelectric stations producing 20 percent and thermal power stations contributing 18 percent. Electricity from other sources such as companies’ own generators and renewable energy sources accounted for 9 percent. The launch of a new combined-cycle power station with an installed capacity of 430 MW in Malženice near Trnava, a project by the E.ON energy group, as well as new photovoltaic plants with an aggregate capacity of 195 MW were the two largest sources of new generating capacity last year.

GENERATION as well as consumption of electricity increased in Slovakia in 2010 as the economy revived, with consumption increasing by 5 percent to 28,761 GWh. Electricity generated within the country grew by 6.3 percent in 2010 to 27,720 GWh, meaning that Slovakia had to import 3.6 percent of the electricity it consumed in 2010, a fall from the 4.8 percent imported in 2009, according to the Economy Ministry’s regular electricity supply report. Nuclear power stations generated 53 percent of Slovakia’s electricity, with hydroelectric stations producing 20 percent and thermal power stations contributing 18 percent. Electricity from other sources such as companies’ own generators and renewable energy sources accounted for 9 percent. The launch of a new combined-cycle power station with an installed capacity of 430 MW in Malženice near Trnava, a project by the E.ON energy group, as well as new photovoltaic plants with an aggregate capacity of 195 MW were the two largest sources of new generating capacity last year.

The most anticipated event to bring more generating capacity to the country will be the launch of the second pair of nuclear reactors at the Mochovce power plant, a project by Slovenské Elektrárne, scheduled to come online in 2012 and 2013. This generating capacity is likely to return Slovakia to the position of an electricity-exporting country.


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