Sulík: We saved European taxpayers about €300 billion

Richard Sulík, whose Freedom and Solidarity (SaS) party did not vote for ratification of changes to the eurozone bailout mechanism and thereby caused the fall of the government of Iveta Radičová on 11 October, said he was satisfied at his party’s actions. He said that it had prevented ordinary people from paying for the losses made by banks, the SITA newswire reported.

Richard Sulík, whose Freedom and Solidarity (SaS) party did not vote for ratification of changes to the eurozone bailout mechanism and thereby caused the fall of the government of Iveta Radičová on 11 October, said he was satisfied at his party’s actions. He said that it had prevented ordinary people from paying for the losses made by banks, the SITA newswire reported.

“Today we saved European taxpayers more than €300 billion that, in the alternative case, would have been paid in order to rescue private banks,” Sulík said, as quoted by SITA. He added that his party received a mandate to protect people, not to pay to salvage banks and their profits.

“We are sorry that because of our principled position we have been blackmailed by the uniting of the vote over the changes to the European Financial Stability Fund (EFSF) with the confidence vote,” said Sulík, as quoted by SITA, adding that the party has always supported Radičová as prime minister. He stressed that SaS’ conscience is more important than political decisions.

Sulík said he was not afraid of losing his post as speaker of parliament. If MPs decide to recall him he said he would “bear it with humility”, SITA wrote.

Source: SITA

Compiled by Radka Minarechová from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

The processing of personal data is subject to our Privacy Policy and the Cookie Policy. Before submitting your e-mail address, please make sure to acquaint yourself with these documents.

Top stories

PM Pellegrini survives no-confidence vote

The session was finally held after several unsuccessful attempts.

Prime Minister Peter Pellegrini during the parliamentary session on September 13, during which MPs backed the proposal for a vote of no confidence against him.

Nobelist: Molecular machines can work like smart drugs

In science things often go wrong, sometimes for a long time, but these failures can lead to something beautiful, says 2016 Nobel Prize Laureate Ben Feringa.

Ben Feringa during a lecture at the Comenius University. He visited Slovakia at the invitation of the Slovak Chemical Society at the Slovak Academy of Sciences (SAV) and his stay was supported by Comenius University in Bratislava, the Embassy of the Netherlands to Slovakia and the ESET Foundation within the ESET Science Award project.

UK government launches a campaign before Brexit

The new campaign informs the public about specific actions they need to take to secure their rights and services in their host country.

A Pro EU protestor holds balloons opposite parliament in London, on September 9, 2019. British Prime Minister Boris Johnson voiced optimism on the same day that a new Brexit deal can be reached so Britain leaves the European Union by October 31.

Most-Híd is losing MPs

Party chair Béla Bugár has rejected claims about the decay.

Béla Bugár