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SaS leaders defend their vote on EFSF

A day after Slovakia’s four-party coalition government fell due to failure of one of the coalition parties to support the changes in the EFSF rescue fund that was linked to a confidence vote in the government, representatives of the Freedom and Solidarity (SaS) party claim that the fall of the government was not their fault, the Sme daily wrote.

A day after Slovakia’s four-party coalition government fell due to failure of one of the coalition parties to support the changes in the EFSF rescue fund that was linked to a confidence vote in the government, representatives of the Freedom and Solidarity (SaS) party claim that the fall of the government was not their fault, the Sme daily wrote.

SaS MP Martin Poliačik told Sme that he was not happy with the outcome but he blamed those who decided to combine the votes. He added that he had hoped that top level leaders of the coalition parties would agree on an EFSF compromise.

“It was a mistake that we were not able to settle things,” said Economy Minister Juraj Miškov from SaS. He and other ministers from SaS have refused to leave their ministerial chairs even though they were asked to do so by Prime Minister Iveta Radičová.

The head of the SaS caucus in parliament, Jozef Kollár, commented that the prime minister’s call for the resignations was an “emotional breakdown” after the EFSF vote and hinted that Radičová was weak, Sme wrote.

He also stated, as reported by Sme on October 13, that SaS was ready for a compromise but leaders of the Slovak Democratic Christian Union (SDKÚ) were not. He stated that SDKÚ’s chairman, Mikuláš Dzurinda, had offered a compromise giving SaS the right of veto on individual country loans but when SaS later proposed it SDKÚ’s offer was no longer on the table.

Richard Sulík, the chairman of SaS and speaker of parliament, also rejected criticism that the fall of the government was the responsibility of his party. Labour Minister Jozef Mihál from SaS said on Wednesday October 12 that he thought he would still be able to push through his tax payroll levy changes in parliament while SaS MP Kamil Krnáč stated he thought he could still be elected as the head of the National Security Authority (NBÚ).

Source: Sme

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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