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Bratislava's Charlie's cinema re-opens as Kino Lumiere

A ONCE-POPULAR film complex comprising several cinema screens and an underground disco has partially re-opened in the centre of the Slovak capital. The former Charlie's Centrum club is now called Kino Lumiere (Cinema Lumiere) and is showing films daily on two of the complex’s ground-floor screens. The presentations are mainly arthouse films, including Slovak and Czech productions. Among the Slovak films being screened in the near future, with English subtitles, is the successful Dom (House) by Zuzana Liová.

The entrance hall of Kino Lumiere in central Bratislava. (Source: TASR)

A ONCE-POPULAR film complex comprising several cinema screens and an underground disco has partially re-opened in the centre of the Slovak capital. The former Charlie's Centrum club is now called Kino Lumiere (Cinema Lumiere) and is showing films daily on two of the complex’s ground-floor screens. The presentations are mainly arthouse films, including Slovak and Czech productions. Among the Slovak films being screened in the near future, with English subtitles, is the successful Dom (House) by Zuzana Liová.

“In September we [started] to screen films from the largest non-commercial travelling film festival called Project 100 – 2011, so audiences in this cinema [would] have the chance to see films awarded the Grand Prix at the most prestigious international festivals,” Peter Dubecký, the general director of the Slovak Film Institute (SFI), which now runs the complex, stated in a press release. ”The premises should later be used to premiere Slovak and European films. In the future, we would like to address children, seniors and we will focus on film education. We would like to mount Little History of Cinematography sessions with lectured introductions. There are already several festivals that would like to perform part of their activities here… Archives in the neighbouring countries have expressed their interest in cooperation on representative screenings, of national cinematographies. We would like to make room for all those films, activities and events which do not have any other space.”

The history of the premises, which are owned by the state, is complex. Charlie Centrum was a well-known entertainment venue in the 1990s and early 2000s but it closed in late 2009. According to the SFI, the previous operator’s lease expired in 2007, but it continued to operate for more than two years. The SFI says it acted to close the venue when the operator failed to pay for the electricity it was using.

The new Kino Lumiere opened its doors to the public on September 5 and it is the first time that the SFI has operated in its own premises. Only the two biggest screens are currently being used, but the SFI plans to re-open the ground-floor café soon and then gradually renovate and re-open the whole building, Dubecký said at the opening.


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