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Most police 'pass' new evaluations

THE NEW system to evaluate the work of police officers is good and a new government should not change it, said Slovakia’s national police chief, Jaroslav Spišiak, as he released information showing that 66 percent of Slovakia’s police officers were evaluated as satisfactory, the TASR newswire reported.

THE NEW system to evaluate the work of police officers is good and a new government should not change it, said Slovakia’s national police chief, Jaroslav Spišiak, as he released information showing that 66 percent of Slovakia’s police officers were evaluated as satisfactory, the TASR newswire reported.

“I am convinced that this system is so good, so qualitative that it can effectively raise the personal profiles of police officers; so it is not very easy to stop it because it would not mean one step back, but one hundred steps back,” Spišiak said, as quoted by the SITA newswire.

Spišiak believes the most recent evaluation, conducted between July and September 2011, was very good. The Pravda daily had earlier written that in the first month of the system nearly 72 percent of the police officers were evaluated poorly, while TASR wrote that the recent evaluation found the work of only 20 percent of the officers was unsatisfactory.

The police president commented that he was the first chief who openly said what he expected of his officers and and how they were to do it and stressed that he was willing to resign if the officers did not succeed.

The results achieved by his officers “have been revolutionary – the best since independent Slovakia was established”, Spišiak stated, as quoted by TASR, adding that the new evaluation system was not prepared to punish unsatisfactory police officers but to recognise those doing the best work.

Former national police chief Ján Packa questioned the evaluation process and said police officers had learned how to write the things that Spišiak wanted them to write, SITA reported.


“The system allows police officers who deceive to have better results than those who work honestly,” Packa stated, as quoted by SITA.


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