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Spoiling tactics mean Matovič must find alternative name for new party

The Ordinary People and Independent Personalities faction – known colloquially as Ordinary People – that leader Igor Matovič is seeking to establish as a new party will have to find a new name, the Sme daily reported on November 2.

The Ordinary People and Independent Personalities faction – known colloquially as Ordinary People – that leader Igor Matovič is seeking to establish as a new party will have to find a new name, the Sme daily reported on November 2.

Matovič applied for registration of the party on Friday, October 28, only to find that an existing but obscure non-parliamentary party, the Slovak National Coalition, led by Víťazoslav Móric, had already re-registered itself under the same name. Móric's party, which attracted 0.17 percent of votes in the 2006 general election, was originally named the True Slovak National Party. As the names and abbreviations of existing parties cannot be used by new ones, Matovič will have to come up with a new name. As of Tuesday, November 1, the independent MP had not commented on the issue, Sme wrote.

Móric told the TASR newswire that he did not plan to return to active politics, but had registered the name, and thus blocked Matovič’s planned move, in order to “calm the current political situation”. He continued: “Modern-day phoenixes only aggravate and split the political scene. In the global world that is being born, and in the current global crisis, our politicians should pull together at least in terms of fundamental ideas,” as reported by TASR.

Source: Sme

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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