NEWS IN SHORT

'Three strikes' ruled constitutional

REPEAT offenders who commit more than three crimes can be imprisoned for life, the Constitutional Court has ruled in a case over the constitutionality of the ‘three strikes and you’re out’ principle, the TASR newswire reported.

REPEAT offenders who commit more than three crimes can be imprisoned for life, the Constitutional Court has ruled in a case over the constitutionality of the ‘three strikes and you’re out’ principle, the TASR newswire reported.

In 2008, the Pezinok District Court appealed to the Constitutional Court, seeking to have the principle, which was introduced by the amended Penal Code, declared unconstitutional. The court referred to the case of a repeat offender identified only as Karol M. who faced charges of blackmail. Under the principle, the man was to be sentenced for life as he had been convicted for the same crime in the past, although he was only a juvenile when the earlier convictions were secured.

In its ruling, the Constitutional Court found that the principle does not violate the basic right not to be tortured and humiliated. Furthermore, it found that the original complaint was no longer substantiated as the amendment to the Penal Code did not prescribe only life imprisonment, but also allows exceptional 20-year and 25-year sentences.


Get daily Slovak news directly to your inbox

Top stories

News digest: Slovakia still dealing with the loss of its talent

Economy minister promises extensive support for hydrogen technologies in Slovakia. Far-right supporters protested in front of PM’s house during the weekend.

The far-right ĽSNS organised a protest in front of PM Igor Matovič's house in Trnava.

Hospital manners expose the toxicity of Kollár

Unjustified privileges overshadow some good news of the coalition's work. Halloween testing will not be repeated during advent time.

PM Igor Matovič (l) and Speaker of Parliament Boris Kollár

Sulík’s party benefits from the dispute with PM Matovič

The Hlas party of former PM Pellegrini is rising, too.

Economy Minister Richard Sulík (l) was charged by PM Igor Matovič (r) to purchase millions of antigen tests.

Anyone can publish a book. Authors often avoid publishers

Self-publishing is setting a new trend.

Nikoleta Kováčová has published two cookbooks without the aid of a publishing house.