Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

Matovič woos Hlina to join Ordinary People slate

Neither the leader of the Ordinary People and Independent Personalities party Igor Matovič nor civic activist Alojz Hlina were able to confirm Wednesday, November 16, whether Hlina would run for parliament on the party’s slate for the March 2012 general election, the TASR newswire reported on Wednesday.

Neither the leader of the Ordinary People and Independent Personalities party Igor Matovič nor civic activist Alojz Hlina were able to confirm Wednesday, November 16, whether Hlina would run for parliament on the party’s slate for the March 2012 general election, the TASR newswire reported on Wednesday.

"I'd rather Alojz Hlina was on our slate, but I'll leave it up to him to decide. He hasn't told me for sure whether he'll run or not," said Matovič. Matovič was speaking as the foundation stone was laid for Hlina's private "November 17 Museum" in Bratislava, which will present the events surrounding the fall of communism in the then Czechoslovakia beginning on November 17, 1989. "I view him [Hlina] as a symbol of civic activism in Slovakia. And I want our slate to have a symbol," said Matovič, calling Hlina a "good person". "I need to know him better, though, I've only sat down with him three times for three hours each," he added.

"I like Matovič's project and I even believe that this country needs it, and we're close to each other," Hlina said, as quoted by TASR. But he warned: "You know, I can't sit with [Slovak National Party chairman] Ján Slota in the same parliament." When asked what he would do if both he and Slota were to be elected to parliament, Hlina said that he would never sit in the same room as Slota.

Source: TASR

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

Top stories

In praise of concrete

It was once notorious for its drab tower blocks and urban crime, but Petržalka now epitomises modern Slovakia.

Petržalka is the epitome of communist-era architecture.

Slow down, fashion

Most people are unaware that buying too many clothes too harms the environment.

In shallow waters, experts are expendable

Mihál says that it is Sulík, the man whom his political opponents mocked for having a calculator for a brain, who “is pulling the party out of liberal waters and towards somewhere completely different”.

Richard Sulík is a man of slang.

Blog: Exploring 20th century military sites in Bratislava

It seems to be the fate of military sites and objects in Bratislava that none of them were ever used for the purposes they were built for - cavernas from WWI, bunkers from WWII, nuclear shelters or the anti-aircraft…

One nuclear shelter with a capacity for several hundred people now serves as a music club with suitable name Subclub (formerly U-club).