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One in every 112 employees in Slovakia comes from another country

According to the latest statistics presented by the Labour, Social Affairs and Family Centre (ÚPSVaR) on Thursday, November 24, the number of foreigners working in Slovakia now exceeds 20,000, and only around one in five of them (4,354) are women. The highest number of foreign employees registered in Slovakia comes from Romania (4,210), followed by Czechs (2,855), Poles (2,108), Hungarians (2,074) and Ukrainians (968).

According to the latest statistics presented by the Labour, Social Affairs and Family Centre (ÚPSVaR) on Thursday, November 24, the number of foreigners working in Slovakia now exceeds 20,000, and only around one in five of them (4,354) are women. The highest number of foreign employees registered in Slovakia comes from Romania (4,210), followed by Czechs (2,855), Poles (2,108), Hungarians (2,074) and Ukrainians (968).

When it comes to foreigners from Asian countries, the number of Korean employees is the highest (872), while the number of Vietnamese and Chinese employees is around 600 in total, the TASR newswire reported, citing the ÚPSVaR statistics. Slovakia has also attracted some people from more far-flung countries, including one person each from Venezuela, Zambia, Equatorial Guinea, Namibia and Mauritius. According to October's statistics, there were 21,031 foreigners on the Slovak labour market, while the overall number of employed Slovaks was about 2.4 million. Thus, one job in every 112 in Slovakia was occupied by a non-Slovak.

Source: TASR

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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