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Lipšic threatens to quit politics over KDH election slate

Interior minister and Christian Democratic Movement (KDH) vice-chairman Daniel Lipšic is considering leaving politics, the Sme daily reported on Friday, November 25. He is disappointed with his party’s candidate list, which is to be approved on Friday by a KDH Council session in Martin.

Interior minister and Christian Democratic Movement (KDH) vice-chairman Daniel Lipšic is considering leaving politics, the Sme daily reported on Friday, November 25. He is disappointed with his party’s candidate list, which is to be approved on Friday by a KDH Council session in Martin.

KDH’s 'young wing', comprising Jana Žitňanska, Radoslav Procházka and Karol Hirman, has been given lower places on the party's election slate – and thus lower chances of being elected to parliament – than Lipšic wanted. He expressed the opinion that the KDH leadership had preferred people who were inclined towards forming a coalition with the Smer party, Sme reported.

KDH chairman Ján Figeľ said in response that Žitňanská and Procházka are in good, electable places on the slate and that he does not understand Lipšic’s concerns. The party also intends to insert football coach Ladislav Jurkemik as a candidate among the first ten places on the slate. Lipšic believes that people who are popular and could win many votes are being moved lower on the slate as they do not agree with the possible formation of a coalition with Smer. He asked the KDH Council to change the slate, and threatened to leave the party if this did not happen. He added he had received a good offer to work in the legal profession.

Source: Sme

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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