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Parliament overrides presidential veto of law on judges

The Act on Judges and Judicial Assistants, as drafted by the Justice Ministry in October, will come into effect on January 1, 2012 after parliament overrode President Ivan Gašparovič's veto, with the original version of the amendment being backed by 76 MPs on Tuesday, November 29. Gašparovič had objected to several proposals in the legislation, the TASR newswire wrote.

The Act on Judges and Judicial Assistants, as drafted by the Justice Ministry in October, will come into effect on January 1, 2012 after parliament overrode President Ivan Gašparovič's veto, with the original version of the amendment being backed by 76 MPs on Tuesday, November 29. Gašparovič had objected to several proposals in the legislation, the TASR newswire wrote.

The amendment re-introduces assessment of judges’ work in five-year cycles and introduces new assessment criteria as well as a grading system. According to the amendment, if a judge fails an assessment, this can lead to their dismissal. The law is also designed to improve the functioning of judges’ disciplinary tribunals by instituting random selection of tribunal members. According to the legislation, a judge can be docked 15-30 percent of their salary for a disciplinary transgression.

Source: TASR

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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