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Ambassadors watch as disciplinary case against Banská Bystrica judge ends

Disciplinary action against Judge Juraj Babjak was halted in a case that was open for two years. But the judge said he did not get full satisfaction, the Sme daily wrote on December 15.

Disciplinary action against Judge Juraj Babjak was halted in a case that was open for two years. But the judge said he did not get full satisfaction, the Sme daily wrote on December 15.

The former chairman of the Banská Bystrica Regional Court, Ján Bobor, filed the disciplinary motion against Babjak in 2009 based on alleged procrastination in handling cases. Sme wrote that the judge had been assigned case files with over 30,000 pages in one day and that no one responded to Babjak’s objection that he would not be able to handle such a workload.

The disciplinary panel of appeals acknowledged in October that Babjak could not have avoided delays with this volume of work. The appeals panel overturned the decision of the first-instance disciplinary court that sought to demote Babjak and returned the case back to it.

The court senate then stopped the disciplinary proceeding against Babjak because the new chairman of the Banská Bystrica Regional Court, Milan Ďurica, withdrew the disciplinary motion against the judge. Babjak had demanded to be fully acquitted of the accusation against him but Sme wrote that the panel did not comply with that request.

Sme wrote that US Ambassador Theodore Sedgwick, Dutch Ambassador Daphne Bergsma, Norwegian Ambassador Trine Skymoen and representatives of the embassies of Britain and Austria, were present in the court at the end of the disciplinary proceeding against Babjak.

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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