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Prosecutor’s office to establish special team to investigate ‘Gorilla document’

The General Prosecutor’s Office will set up a special team to launch an investigation of the document codenamed Gorilla that was prepared by the Slovak Intelligence Service (SIS) in 2005-2006, the TASR newswire reported on December 30.

The General Prosecutor’s Office will set up a special team to launch an investigation of the document codenamed Gorilla that was prepared by the Slovak Intelligence Service (SIS) in 2005-2006, the TASR newswire reported on December 30.

“The first step of the team will be addressing a repeat request to SIS to remove the code of secrecy from certain agents,” stated Jana Tökölyová, spokesperson for the General Prosecutor’s Office, as quoted by TASR. She added that the first request made by the prosecutor for agents to reveal confidential information was denied by SIS.

Reportedly the 44,000-word document codenamed Gorilla describes operations conducted by the SIS that had the aim of collecting information on what the document indicates was political influence by the Penta financial group between 2005 and 2006. The document reportedly features the name of Jaroslav Haščák, Penta’s co-owner, and his alleged conversations and connections with ruling coalition politicians such as former economy minister Jirko Malchárek, a nominee of the now-defunct New Citizens’ Alliance (ANO), and other political nominees, including some from Smer party, the Sme daily reported.

Malchárek, representatives of the Penta group, and Deputy General Prosecutor Dobroslav Trnka have questioned the accuracy of information reportedly in the document.

Source: TASR

For more information on this story please see: Police to reopen Gorilla

Compiled by Radka Minarechová from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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