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Sme reports on investigation of statement on Slovak Communist Party website

The Sme daily wrote that the Communist Party of Slovakia (KSS) states on its website that crimes committed by the previous communist regime do not exist and even though the Slovak parliament recently passed a law regarding denying crimes committed during communism, Slovak police have said that the KSS statement does not constitute a crime.

The Sme daily wrote that the Communist Party of Slovakia (KSS) states on its website that crimes committed by the previous communist regime do not exist and even though the Slovak parliament recently passed a law regarding denying crimes committed during communism, Slovak police have said that the KSS statement does not constitute a crime.

Since September 2011 it has been a punishable offence to deny crimes made by the former regime and if KSS was convicted of doing so the police would have the power to dissolve the party. But the police recently said that KSS can leave a statement on its webpage saying that “as there is no collective guilt, no crimes of communism exist”.

“As there was allegedly no reason to open prosecution, the authorised officer rejected the whole case in compliance with the law,” Bratislava Regional Police spokesman František Peczár told Sme.

The MP who proposed the amendment, Ondrej Dostál from the Civic Conservative Party (OKS) told Sme that the police are incorrect in assessing the statement. KSS was the first institution to be investigated in connection with denying crimes committed during communism.

KSS chairman Jozef Hrdlička said on January 2 that his party was not asked to explain anything and expressed his conviction that the party has not done anything in violation of the constitution. Hrdlička said that crimes had been committed by specific people but not by the regime.

No one in Slovakia has ever been convicted of any crimes committed during the communist regime, Sme wrote.

Source: Sme

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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