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Second package of laws on judges becomes effective

The work of judges in Slovakia will be under more public scrutiny as the second package of laws making various changes in the judiciary came into force on January 1. The laws introduce changes to the work of judges, to disciplinary proceedings against judges and to meetings of the country’s Judicial Council, the SITA newswire wrote.

The work of judges in Slovakia will be under more public scrutiny as the second package of laws making various changes in the judiciary came into force on January 1. The laws introduce changes to the work of judges, to disciplinary proceedings against judges and to meetings of the country’s Judicial Council, the SITA newswire wrote.

The judges will be required to undergo an evaluation of their work every five years as well as a review of their judicial ethics, SITA wrote.

"We need to be aware of the fact that [Slovak] judges hold their offices for life. All other offices have a system allowing for some evaluation, or accountability by having a definite
[election] term," said Justice Minister Lucia Žitňanská from the Slovak Democratic and Christian Union (SDKÚ), as quoted by SITA.

Source: SITA

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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