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Greenpeace dismisses stress tests of nuclear plants as 'a farce'

Representatives of environmental lobbying group Greenpeace Slovakia say that the stress testing of Slovak nuclear power plants is nothing but a farce, and is designed merely to calm the public, the TASR newswire reported.

Representatives of environmental lobbying group Greenpeace Slovakia say that the stress testing of Slovak nuclear power plants is nothing but a farce, and is designed merely to calm the public, the TASR newswire reported.

“The original purpose – to find out whether a situation similar to that which occurred at Japan's Fukushima can happen in Europe – has vanished,” said Andrea Zlatňanská of Greenpeace Slovakia, as quoted by TASR. She added that the tests are an attempt to steer public opinion towards the view that the plants are safe.

The NGO claims that from the very beginning the stress testing has not been focused on key problems that endangered the health of the Japanese people – insufficient emergency and evacuation plans – and says it considers the tests a useless piece of paper that has been created out of necessity.

“It is interesting to read that everything is in 100-percent order in Slovakia’s nuclear power plants,” said Zlatňanská, as quoted by TASR. “In other countries, however, stress testing has been taken more seriously. For instance, even in a country such as France, a local regulatory authority made clear in the early stages of testing that safety needs to be enhanced in every single one of their 58 reactors,” she added.

The reaction of Greenpeace came after a press conference held by the Nuclear Supervisory Office (ÚJD) which announced that tests had been completed and their final results sent to Brussels.

“The office detected no flaw that calls for immediate action,” said the chair of the ÚJD, Marta Žiaková, as quoted by TASR. She added that in the case of combining several external factors the nuclear reactors are able to withstand them or to give the operator enough time to solve the problem.

Source: TASR

Compiled by Radka Minarechová from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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