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Henkel Slovensko fined over a cartel agreement

Slovakia's Antimonopoly Office (PMÚ) has issued a fine of €194,000 against Henkel Slovensko and its parent company Henkel Central Eastern Europe Gesellschaft, the SITA newswire wrote. The companies were fined for having concluded a cartel agreement with Procter & Gamble International Operations SA and its Slovak subsidiary.

Slovakia's Antimonopoly Office (PMÚ) has issued a fine of €194,000 against Henkel Slovensko and its parent company Henkel Central Eastern Europe Gesellschaft, the SITA newswire wrote. The companies were fined for having concluded a cartel agreement with Procter & Gamble International Operations SA and its Slovak subsidiary.

Within this contract the firms agreed on prices of laundry detergents in Slovakia and on limiting the volume and frequency of ads promoting them in central Europe. The PMÚ said on January 4 that the companies had negotiated restriction of the volume and frequency of promotion of washing powders in the central-European region from the second half of 1999 until late 2004, adding that by the end of 2002 they agreed to leave prices of new, smaller-size packaging at the original level.

The antimonopoly authority stated that the companies had been exchanging sensitive information. Procter & Gamble was not ultimately fined since it was the first to inform the Antimonopoly Office about the existence of the cartel agreement. Henkel’s fine was cut by 30 percent as both the parent company and its subsidiary admitted to their participation and
cooperated with the PMÚ.

Source: SITA

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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