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Brussels investigates apparent loss of payroll taxes paid to Slovakia by the EC

Funds sent by the European Commission as payroll taxes for the Slovak employees working for the European Union between the years 1999 and 2003 have reportedly been lost. Though about €0.5 million arrived on the Slovak accounts, they were not received by the social insurer Sociálna poisťovňa, the Hospodárske Noviny daily reported.

Funds sent by the European Commission as payroll taxes for the Slovak employees working for the European Union between the years 1999 and 2003 have reportedly been lost. Though about €0.5 million arrived on the Slovak accounts, they were not received by the social insurer Sociálna poisťovňa, the Hospodárske Noviny daily reported.

An investigation of the case has already been launched by both Slovakia’s Office for the Fight against Corruption and authorities in Brussels. An unknown person is sought for harming the financial interests of the European Communities, according to the spokesperson of the Slovak police, Denisa Balogová.

At that time Sociálna poisťovňa was led by nominees from the Party of Democratic Left (SDĽ), Igor Lipták and Miroslav Knitl, and also a nominee from the Slovak Christian and Democratic Union (SDKÚ), František Halmeš. The former managers say know nothing about the missing money.

Source: Hospodárske Noviny

Compiled by Radka Minarechová Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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