Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

Slovaks mourn Havel’s death

VÁCLAV Havel, the first post-communist president of Czechoslovakia, died on December 18. He was rightly considered a moral authority not only in the Czech Republic and Slovakia, Slovak Prime Minister Iveta Radičová wrote in a letter of condolence, but around the world, because for decades he was one of the bravest speakers of the truth even at a time when most Czechs and Slovaks had resigned from doing so and had accepted a life under totalitarianism.

VÁCLAV Havel, the first post-communist president of Czechoslovakia, died on December 18. He was rightly considered a moral authority not only in the Czech Republic and Slovakia, Slovak Prime Minister Iveta Radičová wrote in a letter of condolence, but around the world, because for decades he was one of the bravest speakers of the truth even at a time when most Czechs and Slovaks had resigned from doing so and had accepted a life under totalitarianism.

News of the death of Havel, in the picture by the TASR newswire below, a prominent playwright and outspoken critic of the communist regime, provoked a widespread response among the Slovak public, and among Slovakia’s leading political and cultural figures, many of whom were his close friends. It also prompted a spontaneous response among Slovaks on online social networks as well as in the streets – for instance in front of the Czech Embassy in Bratislava, where people came to light candles and lay flowers in memory of the late president, who served two terms as president of the Czech Republic after Czechoslovakia split in 1993.

Slovakia declared a day of state mourning on December 23, between 8:00 and 18:00, and on the same day Radičová and President Ivan Gašparovič attended Havel’s state funeral in Prague.


Top stories

Transport bothers Bratislava Region

The smallest region in Slovakia has several specifics affecting various fields that will have to be addressed by respective regional authorities.

Candidates for the post of Bratislava Region's governor attending the discussion organised by the Sme daily (l-r): Juraj Droba, Milan Ftáčnik, Rudolf Kusý and Pavol Frešo.

The day Prague fell

It is pointless to talk about the wins and losses of Czech political parties - the one who lost is the Czech Republic.

Andrej Babiš celebrates his election victory.

European Commission does not consider the traditional family controversial

Hoaxes that have appeared on the internet in Slovak over the past two weeks

Famil,y illustrative stock photo

Robert Fico is not Saddam Hussein

It would take too long to list all the crazy distortions the international media presented about Central Europe and the Czech election campaign this week.

Babiš