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NPP stress test results sent to EU

THE NUCLEAR Supervisory Office (ÚJD) finished its stress-testing of Slovakia’s nuclear power plants and sent the results to Brussels on the last day of December 2011, the TASR newswire reported.

THE NUCLEAR Supervisory Office (ÚJD) finished its stress-testing of Slovakia’s nuclear power plants and sent the results to Brussels on the last day of December 2011, the TASR newswire reported.

“The office detected no flaw that calls for immediate action,” ÚJD chair Marta Žiaková said, as quoted by TASR.

Testing began in Slovakia in June 2011 to check preparedness for various kinds of accidents following the disaster in Fukushima earlier in the year.

The ÚJD said the results showed all Slovakia’s facilities are able to deal with the problems in the event of any external accidents, or to provide the operators of the plant with enough time to address problems.

“Despite [the good results] it is still possible to improve the security [of the power plants],” Žiaková said, as quoted by TASR.

The results of the stress tests have been criticised by the environmental group Greenpeace Slovakia, which said that the testing of Slovak nuclear power plants was nothing but a farce designed merely to calm the public, TASR wrote.

The original purpose, to find out whether a situation similar to the one which occurred in Fukushima could happen in Europe, has now vanished and the tests are an attempt to steer public opinion towards the view that the plants are safe, Greenpeace stated.


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