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Doctors should receive payment for vaccinations, says health minister

Current problems surrounding the vaccination of Slovak children could continue, the Sme daily wrote. These started in December 2011, when a law ordering doctors to buy vaccines became effective. Before then, it was usually the patients themselves who bought vaccines, or else waited for their doctor or nurse to procure them on their behalf based on a prescription. Now many doctors are refusing to purchase vaccines directly, and so parents are facing delays getting their children vaccinated.

Current problems surrounding the vaccination of Slovak children could continue, the Sme daily wrote. These started in December 2011, when a law ordering doctors to buy vaccines became effective. Before then, it was usually the patients themselves who bought vaccines, or else waited for their doctor or nurse to procure them on their behalf based on a prescription. Now many doctors are refusing to purchase vaccines directly, and so parents are facing delays getting their children vaccinated.

Health Minister Ivan Uhliarik says he wants to resolve the issue by offering the doctors money. As a result, from February doctors should be entitled to half of the margin for the vaccines which is currently paid to pharmacists, Sme wrote in its Wednesday, January 11, issue. The head of the Association of Private Doctors, Ladislav Pásztor, told Sme that this measure would solve the financial issue created by the law change but not the excessive administrative burden it has brought with it.

The head of the Association of GPs for Children and Young People, Kvetoslava Prcúchová, said that the proposed change would bring problems when implemented. She said she wants Uhliarik to restore the previous conditions for buying vaccines.

The change proposed by Uhliarik might please doctors but it will annoy pharmacies, who would lose part of their margins, Sme reported

Source: Sme

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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