Passenger numbers fall at Bratislava Airport in 2011 but revenues increase

Bratislava's M.R. Štefánik airport (BTS) expects that the number of travellers using the airport in 2011 fell by 4 percent year-on-year, BTS spokesperson Dana Madunická told the TASR newswire on January 16 with nearly 1.6 million people flying in or out of the airport. Despite the drop in passengers, the spokesperson reported that revenues probably rose by a few percent in 2011. The trend in 2011 followed the trend in the previous year ever since SkyEurope airline went bankrupt in 2009, Madunická said, adding that despite unrest in certain Arab countries in early 2011, which resulted in the cancellation of dozens of flights, the airport saw an increase in interest in charter flights.

Bratislava's M.R. Štefánik airport (BTS) expects that the number of travellers using the airport in 2011 fell by 4 percent year-on-year, BTS spokesperson Dana Madunická told the TASR newswire on January 16 with nearly 1.6 million people flying in or out of the airport. Despite the drop in passengers, the spokesperson reported that revenues probably rose by a few percent in 2011.

The trend in 2011 followed the trend in the previous year ever since SkyEurope airline went bankrupt in 2009, Madunická said, adding that despite unrest in certain Arab countries in early 2011, which resulted in the cancellation of dozens of flights, the airport saw an increase in interest in charter flights.

"In a year-on-year comparison, all the summer-season months posted growth of over 10 percent," Madunická stated, as quoted by TASR, with July and August being the busiest months.

Source: TASR

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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