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PM Radičová asks intelligence service to explain circumstances of Gorilla case

It is up to politicians and political parties to decide whether they will take responsibility for the allegation contained in the Gorilla documents, said Prime Minister Iveta Radičová from the Slovak Democratic and Christian Union (SDKÚ) at a press conference on January 16. She was speaking in response to the statement by Freedom and Solidarity (SaS) party leader Richard Sulík a day earlier suggesting that Finance Minister Ivan Mikloš and Foreign Affairs Minister Mikuláš Dzurinda (both from SDKÚ) should withdraw from the party's slate of candidates. Radičová also said she had addressed a letter to the director of the Slovak Intelligence Service (SIS), Karol Mitrík, requesting explanations regarding the file. She asked specifically when SIS was aware of suspicions of alleged influence-peddling during the 2002-2006 government led by Dzurinda reportedly contained in the leaked documents, whether SIS had permission to use the intelligence gathering tools it used, and why the investigation was subsequently closed.

It is up to politicians and political parties to decide whether they will take responsibility for the allegation contained in the Gorilla documents, said Prime Minister Iveta Radičová from the Slovak Democratic and Christian Union (SDKÚ) at a press conference on January 16. She was speaking in response to the statement by Freedom and Solidarity (SaS) party leader Richard Sulík a day earlier suggesting that Finance Minister Ivan Mikloš and Foreign Affairs Minister Mikuláš Dzurinda (both from SDKÚ) should withdraw from the party's slate of candidates.

Radičová also said she had addressed a letter to the director of the Slovak Intelligence Service (SIS), Karol Mitrík, requesting explanations regarding the file. She asked specifically when SIS was aware of suspicions of alleged influence-peddling during the 2002-2006 government led by Dzurinda reportedly contained in the leaked documents, whether SIS had permission to use the intelligence gathering tools it used, and why the investigation was subsequently closed.

"So far, I have received no response," Radičová stated, as quoted by the TASR newswire. The prime minister added that the Gorilla case not only illustrates the possible extent of corruption and nepotism during the process of privatisation but also sheds light on the work of the SIS.

Source: TASR

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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