Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

Doubt cast on authenticity of Gorilla file

File numbers contained in the so-called Gorilla file, a recently leaked document which purports to describe high-level corruption among senior government officials in 2005-6, do not match the numbers used to mark the files of the Slovak Information Service (SIS) intelligence agency, according to the chair of the parliamentary defence and security committee, Martin Fedor, and committee member Robert Kaliňák. The SIS is alleged to have been the ultimate source of the document. Because of this the committee has requested the head of SIS, Karol Mitrík, to submit the relevant documentation, the TASR newswire reported.

File numbers contained in the so-called Gorilla file, a recently leaked document which purports to describe high-level corruption among senior government officials in 2005-6, do not match the numbers used to mark the files of the Slovak Information Service (SIS) intelligence agency, according to the chair of the parliamentary defence and security committee, Martin Fedor, and committee member Robert Kaliňák. The SIS is alleged to have been the ultimate source of the document. Because of this the committee has requested the head of SIS, Karol Mitrík, to submit the relevant documentation, the TASR newswire reported.

“We did not hear anyone attempting to put obstacles in the way of an investigation,” said Fedor, as quoted by TASR, adding that the whole committee supports the investigation into the authenticity of the file.

He also said that it would not be a good thing if politicians began standing in for investigators as there are only eight weeks before the elections and everyone talking about the Gorilla file is biased.

“The biggest guarantee of an impartial investigation would come in the person of newly-elected general prosecutor Jozef Čentéš,” said Fedor, as quoted by TASR. “We should de-politicise this matter.”

Kaliňák stressed that he had seen five versions of the Gorilla file over the course of seven years, and that he is now seeing the current one for the first time. He also said that his party, Smer, does not want to become involved in the case.

“It is a right-wing game, with those who are most active likely to have the greatest interest in it,” he added.

Meanwhile, Interior Minister Daniel Lipšic said that verifying the authenticity of the Gorilla file would not be problematic, especially when it comes to alleged meetings in ‘conspiracy apartments’, TASR wrote.

“[Former economy minister] Mr. [Jirko] Malchárek admitted that they [the meetings] took place,” said Lipšic, as quoted by TASR, speaking at a meeting of the parliamentary defence and security committee. He added that the real problem would be tracking alleged financial transactions.

Source: TASR

Compiled by Radka Minarechová from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

Top stories

They reported corruption at the Foreign Ministry. Now they receive an award

The tenth year of the White Crow award, celebrating young people and activists who break prejudices and go against the tide.

White Crow award laureates

Blog: Slovakia’s time to shine is now

People may be able to recognise Slovakia’s neighbouring countries through associations with food, drinks, beautiful cities or well-known political events. But Slovakia remains very much "hidden".

Bratislava Castle

The day that changed the Tatra mountains for good Photo

The windstorm damaged 12,000 hectares of woods on November 19, 2004.

Tatras after the 2004 calamity

Smer follows a downward trend but may escape oblivion

What does the defeat in regional elections mean for the future of Slovakia’s strongest party?

“How could it be a fiasco when a political party wins most councillors among all parties?” asks PM Robert Fico.