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Slovakia’s unemployment hits highest rate since July 2004

Slovakia’s unemployment rate reached the highest level since July 2004 as it rose to 13.59 percent in December 2011, up 0.26 percentage points month-on-month and up 0.68 percentage points compared to December 2010, the TASR newswire reported.

Slovakia’s unemployment rate reached the highest level since July 2004 as it rose to 13.59 percent in December 2011, up 0.26 percentage points month-on-month and up 0.68 percentage points compared to December 2010, the TASR newswire reported.

The country’s labour offices registered 399,800 unemployed people, with approximately 26,700 newly registered.

“The unemployment rate in December tends to be affected by phenomena such as a drop in seasonal jobs, the termination of temporary jobs and the return of Slovak citizens from abroad,” said representatives of the Central Office of Labour, Social Affair and Family (ÚPSVAR), as quoted by TASR.

The increase in the unemployment rate was felt in all regions in Slovakia. The most significant increases were recorded in Nitra (0.35 percentage points), Trenčín (0.33 percentage points) and Banská Bystrica (0.32 percentage points) regions while the lowest increase was recorded in Bratislava Region (0.02 percentage points).

Source: TASR

Compiled by Radka Minarechová from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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