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Slovakia records surge in newly-founded companies in 2011

The number of companies established in Slovakia in 2011 grew by 8.4 percent year-on-year to reach 19,292, the highest annual increase in the past five years, the TASR newswire wrote, based on an analysis by the Czech Capital Information Agency (ČEKIA) released on January 23. "Businessmen invested €389.9 million in registered capital of newly-founded companies last year [in Slovakia]," stated ČEKIA, as quoted by TASR. These statistics include only limited-liability and joint-stock companies. The ČEKIA analysis indicated that the economic crisis of 2009 had not significantly deterred Slovaks from setting up businesses, TASR wrote.

The number of companies established in Slovakia in 2011 grew by 8.4 percent year-on-year to reach 19,292, the highest annual increase in the past five years, the TASR newswire wrote, based on an analysis by the Czech Capital Information Agency (ČEKIA) released on January 23.

"Businessmen invested €389.9 million in registered capital of newly-founded companies last year [in Slovakia]," stated ČEKIA, as quoted by TASR. These statistics include only limited-liability and joint-stock companies. The ČEKIA analysis indicated that the economic crisis of 2009 had not significantly deterred Slovaks from setting up businesses, TASR wrote.

"Despite the difficult times through which the global economy has been going in recent years, it's obvious that Slovaks aren't afraid of doing business," stated agency analyst Petra Štěpánová.

At the end of 2011, ČEKIA registered 189,418 capital companies in Slovakia: 7,584 joint-stock companies and the remainder limited-liability companies. Within the past five years, the number of capital companies in Slovakia grew by almost 60 percent.

Less than fourteen percent of companies established last year are exclusively in the hands of foreign shareholders, the SITA newswire wrote. The number of Slovak firms has increased by almost 60 percent over the past five years while the number in the Czech Republic increased by only 25 percent, Štěpánová stated.

Source: TASR, SITA

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
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