Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

Employers’ group wants to see ‘experts’ tackle challenges in future cabinet

The new government that will be formed after the early election in March should be made up of experts who will be able to tackle Slovakia's most serious problems, said the president of the Association of Employers' Unions (AZZZ), Tomáš Malatinský, at a press conference on Wednesday, January 25.

The new government that will be formed after the early election in March should be made up of experts who will be able to tackle Slovakia's most serious problems, said the president of the Association of Employers' Unions (AZZZ), Tomáš Malatinský, at a press conference on Wednesday, January 25.

The AZZZ has drawn up a list of five challenges for the next cabinet that it says reflects the biggest problems affecting the Slovak business environment. The association wants to discuss its initiative with all relevant political parties in February. "There should be less populism and more professionalism," said Malatinský, as quoted by the TASR newswire, adding that politicians often resort to using pleasing slogans and promises but lack an expert approach.

The AZZZ said would prefer to see quality election programmes from parties instead of attractive promises. "It lacks purpose to draw up a programme that you can't carry out," he said. The top priority stated on the AZZZ's list of challenges is to address education and employment as, it says, this issue has long been neglected. "Education in our case equals employment. Slovakia lacks experts. We lack the qualifications that should be provided by the education system," said Malatinský. In this connection, AZZZ warned that the average age of Slovak experts is growing, and that new ones are not coming into the system.

Source: TASR

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

Top stories

Governmental campaign should bring Slovaks home from the UK

The Slovak cabinet plans to persuade its expats living and working in the UK with at least a bachelor degree to return home: a campaign offering specific jobs should help.

Young researchers, IT experts and medical staffers are needed in Slovakia, illustrative stock photo.

EU lawyers claiming the Russian annexation of Crimea as legal is a hoax

One lawyer does not mean all EU lawyers; immigrants attacking a shepherd dog and HAARP causing hurricanes in the US are hoaxes, too.

Hoax on immigrants attackign two German shepdherds and ebing bitten yb them

Co-founder and co-owner of Sme daily dies

A major Slovak entrepreneur, Peter Vajda, died in Prague on October 15. He was exceptional for his innate sense of democracy and believing in equal opportunities for all.

Peter Vajda

Šefčovič: Slovakia’s economy has grown 60 percent since joining the EU

Slovak consumers are growing economically stronger and will be an important stabilisation factor in the future

European Commission Vice-president for Energy Union Maroš Šefčovič