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Be safe before travelling abroad to work: tips from the IOM

•Obtain the address and the telephone number of the Slovak embassy in the country where you are travelling and memorise them.

•Obtain the address and the telephone number of the Slovak embassy in the country where you are travelling and memorise them.

•Make a copy of your passport and put it in a safe place that only you know about because having a copy facilitates the issuance of a new passport. Leave another copy of your passport and an up-to-date photo at home with your family.

•Have sufficient funds for a return ticket. Never give your passport or ID card to anyone (except police officers). You should handle all administrative duties yourself.

•Inform your family where you are staying and regularly call them. Agree with them on a warning signal (for instance a certain sentence) that you will use if you are in danger.

•Carefully investigate any person or agency offering you a job. Every Slovak agency that offers jobs abroad needs a certificate from the Central Office of Labour, Social Affairs and Family to do so. Verify your future employer’s address and whether the firm actually exists.

•Sign an employment contract in a language you understand and depart only after it is signed. The contract must contain the name and address of the employer, contact data, and conditions of accommodation, salary and duration of employment.

You can find more information at www.bezpecnecestovanie.iom.sk (in Slovak), from helplinka@iom.int or by calling 0800 800 818.

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