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Only 728 Slovaks ask for mail ballot

ONLY 728 Slovak citizens who no longer have permanent residence in Slovakia have requested a mail ballot for the March parliamentary elections by sending an application to the special election office in Bratislava’s Petržalka district, the TASR newswire reported.

ONLY 728 Slovak citizens who no longer have permanent residence in Slovakia have requested a mail ballot for the March parliamentary elections by sending an application to the special election office in Bratislava’s Petržalka district, the TASR newswire reported.

“Seventeen applications were incomplete and four electronic applications did not meet the deadline [of January 20],” said Mária Grebeňová Laczová from the press department of the Petržalka municipal office, as quoted by TASR.

The applications that were valid came from Slovaks living in European countries as well as in the US, Japan, Canada, Australia, Mexico, the United Arab Emirates, South Africa, Kenya and Barbados, the office reported.

These expats will now receive a ballot by post that must be returned to Slovakia on or before March 9. Slovaks abroad who have a permanent residence in Slovakia had to request a ballot from the municipal office of their residence, also by January 20.

No information was available on how many of these citizens had requested a mail ballot for the March election.

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