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Hackers initiate attack on Slovak parliament's website

The 'Anonymous' hacker movement said it launched an attack against the website of Slovakia’s parliament at 18:00 on Monday, January 30, the TASR newswire reported.

The 'Anonymous' hacker movement said it launched an attack against the website of Slovakia’s parliament at 18:00 on Monday, January 30, the TASR newswire reported.

The hackers said this was in response to the Parliament Office filing a criminal complaint against an 'unknown perpetrator' who allegedly damaged the parliament building with firecrackers during a Gorilla protest last Friday.

TASR attempted to log on to parliament's website, www.nrsr.sk, on Monday but the service was unavailable. The Sme daily wrote in its January 31 issue that parliament’s website had been hacked.

The Anonymous movement, an international grouping, attacked several Slovak websites in recent days including the Penta financial group and its daughter companies Prima Banka and Dôvera, the Government Office, and the Smer and Slovak Democratic and Christian Union political parties, announcing that the reason for the attacks was the Gorilla wiretapping scandal and the planned vote in parliament on the Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement (ACTA).

Source: TASR, Sme

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
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