Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

Former police officer sentenced to life for killing his lover’s husband

Bratislava I District Court has sentenced former policeman Peter V. to life imprisonment for the brutal murder by burning of his neighbour and rival in love, the SITA newswire wrote on Tuesday, January 31.

Bratislava I District Court has sentenced former policeman Peter V. to life imprisonment for the brutal murder by burning of his neighbour and rival in love, the SITA newswire wrote on Tuesday, January 31.

According to the prosecution, the murder was a follow-up to a love affair between Peter V. and his neighbour's wife, which she wanted to end. In summer 2008, the policeman blocked his neighbour's car on a road near Plavecký Štvrtok, poured petrol over the driver and set him alight. The victim managed to get out of his car and get to the hospital, but died some days later as a result of severe burns. Before he died, he identified his attacker. The sentenced man denied the crime. The case has lasted since June 2009, and was delayed after two forensic experts expressed differing opinions on the case.

Source: SITA

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

Top stories

Crates and boxes. Slovaks discover new ways of grocery shopping

Farmer’s boxes are gaining customers in Slovakia as people slowly become more conscious about quality and the origin of the food they eat.

Blog: Are flying cars coming to the skies?

At least 19 companies, including a Slovak one, are currently developing flying car planes, but there are still many issues that must be worked out.

AeroMobil

What kind of expectations do some Slovaks have for world leaders?

Among EU member states, opinions of the United States declined in all but two — Poland (which makes some sense) and Slovakia (which does not).

Donald Trump

The biggest antiquarian bookshop from Leopoldov is stored in Trnava Photo

The new year could bring a new cultural centre in antiquarian bookshop.

Archive photo