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Smer leads latest poll, KDH second

A new party, 99 Percent – Civic Voice is on the verge on being elected to parliament, according to the latest political opinion poll. It is just 0.7 percentage points short of the 5-percent threshold needed to enter parliament. The poll was a telephone survey carried out by the Focus agency between January 20 and 27 on a sample of 1,141 respondents.

A new party, 99 Percent – Civic Voice is on the verge on being elected to parliament, according to the latest political opinion poll. It is just 0.7 percentage points short of the 5-percent threshold needed to enter parliament. The poll was a telephone survey carried out by the Focus agency between January 20 and 27 on a sample of 1,141 respondents.

The survey results suggest that seven parties would make it into parliament: Smer, currently in opposition, would win 41.4 percent of the vote and 72 seats, while in second place would come the Christian Democratic Movement (KDH) on 9.4 percent, with 16 mandates, the SITA newswire reported, citing Focus. The Slovak Democratic and Christian Union (SDKÚ) would win 8.2 percent of the vote and fourteen seats in the 150-member parliament. Freedom and Solidarity (SaS) would garner 7.6 percent, followed by Most-Híd with 7.2 percent, and both parties would win thirteen deputy seats. Support for another new party, Ordinary People and Independent Personalities, increased compared to the last survey, rising by 1.6 percentage points, meaning the party would win 12 seats with 6.8 percent of the vote. The last to make it to parliament would be the Slovak National Party (SNS) led by Ján Slota, with 5.6-percent support and 10 seats.

Respondents were asked which party they would support if an election were held on the following weekend. Of those polled, 16.5 percent said they would not take part in the elections, while 31.5 percent were undecided about their participation. Despite more than half of those polled saying they would cast a vote, 11.4 percent had not decided whom to vote for.

Source: SITA

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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